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A month without alcohol and its changes

Filed in Blog | Posted by nrwadmin on August 15, 2022

How a month without alcohol changed my skin, hair & nails

For many of us, alcohol played a unique role during the pandemic. Instead of meeting up with friends in a bar in the evening, we mostly sat around at home for months – and if we did feel like having a drink, the DIY version wasn’t as expensive as the bar cocktail for eight or nine euros. The result: people like to pour themselves another glass. Continue reading this post on the Escort Service Website.

In any case, I can say with certainty: My recreational alcohol consumption has increased quite a bit since Corona. At least it seems I wasn’t the only one: During the pandemic, numerous alcohol memes went viral – from Meryl Streep and Stanley Tucci mixing cocktails to the guy toasting himself in the mirror. Have you ever been in a WhatsApp group if you haven’t received at least one meme along the lines of “Haha, we all drink so much” in the last two years?

While we’ve all struggled to navigate the “new normal,” drinking was just part of it for many of us. At every event and meeting via Zoom, FaceTime and Co. I sipped something on the side. When the lockdown ended, drinks in the park were the order of the day.

You had to celebrate that you survived all that, didn’t you?

In the meantime, the challenging Corona period is essentially behind us. We finally get to socialize again – and these meetings often include alcohol. At 32, I don’t tend to get drunk anymore, but I still regularly treat myself to a glass of this, one of these. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), however, escort girls, and women in general, should consume 12 grams of pure alcohol per day (equivalent to 125 milliliters of wine, for example) and have at least two alcohol-free days per week. And while I’m not a big drinker, I’ll add up quickly if I indulge in a few glasses of Syrah on weekdays and a gin and tonic on weekends.

There are numerous studies on the harmful effects of alcohol on our general health. Regular drinking can also have a demonstrable impact on appearance. So over the past year, I’ve been asking myself more about what this liquid sin was doing to my hair, nails, and skin. Every skin issue I try to manage with proper care (redness, dryness, enlarged pores, puffiness, and dullness) could be related to the inflammatory effects of the alcohol I drink weekly.

Cocktails and wine, in particular, contain a lot of sugar and therefore have a high glycemic index; According to studies, it can be responsible for various skin problems. Interestingly, clear spirits like gin, vodka, and tequila are less high in sugar and are also eliminated more quickly by us.

Because I was convinced that giving up alcohol could do more than any skincare product, no matter how expensive, I gave up alcohol entirely for four weeks.

I usually use skincare ingredients like niacinamide (for a more balanced complexion) and hyaluronic acid (for hydration); now, I wanted to know how my skin would do if I didn’t dehydrate it from the inside by draining alcohol for a few weeks.

I often suffer from stubborn dry patches in the corners of the mouth (also known as angular cheilitis or angular cheilitis) and wondered if giving up alcohol would improve it. In addition, I’m prone to breakouts, and while my nails increase, they’re not particularly strong and tend to break off. My hair takes color well and is easy to style, but it’s pretty okay, greasy and flat.

Before I went completely into withdrawal, I got advice from a few experts. Skin and wellness expert Marie Reynolds told me, “Alcohol is a toxin filtered out of the body through the kidneys and liver. The kidneys also affect the density and structure of our hair, as well as the texture and color of our skin.” Surprisingly, Marie considers binge drinking significantly unhealthier than the occasional glass of wine. “Excess Alcohol attacks the liver, kidneys and spleen. This can then be reflected in the skin, hair and nails.”

The dermatologist, Dr Emma Wedgeworth, explains:

“In the short term, alcohol causes vasodilation, i.e. an expansion of blood vessels. This brings the blood vessels closer to the skin’s surface, which can cause redness. Alcoholic beverages, especially red wine, can also release histamine, which can cause itching and skin irritation.” Consumption can also indirectly affect the skin, for example, through its dehydrating effect. “Many of my patients who suffer from inflammatory skin diseases such as acne, rosacea and eczema find that their symptoms worsen after drinking alcohol”.

Wedgeworth adds that there is strong evidence to suggest that drinking over the recommended amount is also linked to inflammatory skin conditions like psoriasis and an increased risk of skin cancer. Like Marie, Dr Wedgeworth that higher alcohol consumption can seriously affect the liver and thus the skin. “Malnutrition can also have negative consequences for hair and nails,” she adds. But to see any real improvements, you’d have to be off alcohol for several months, explains Dr Wedgeworth.

When I drink regularly, I notice that my pigment spots get worse, my dark circles become more visible, blemishes become more pronounced, and I generally look less “fresh”.

Could it help to give up alcohol altogether? “Reducing consumption could improve dark circles and blemishes,” says Dr Wedgeworth. It has to do with the anatomy of the skin. “The skin around the eyes is fragile, making it susceptible to changes related to moisture and sleep.

Alcohol can be inflammatory and contains a lot of sugar. That means it could increase blemishes and acne. Stopping drinking could improve both fairly quickly,” she explains. I wondered if four alcohol-free weeks would be enough to see a difference; Marie was pretty sure about that and encouraged me to eat healthier to help me progress. My body would benefit from this much more when sober. At the same time, according to her, I adjusted to more energy and better sleep – which can also have long-term positive consequences for the skin.

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